USCIS expands provisional unlawful presence waivers to LPRs

USCIS has announced that, beginning August 29, 2016, more persons will be eligible to seek an I-601A provisional waiver of unlawful presence.  Eligibility for the I-601A waiver will be extended to spouses and children of lawful permanent residents.  Eligibility will also extend to the spouses and children who accompany or follow to join the principal immigrants.

The full details of this expansion are available here.

Before this expansion, only spouses and children of U.S. citizens were eligible to apply for the I-601A provisional waiver of unlawful presence.  Beginning August 29, 2016, spouses and children of lawful permanent residents, or “green-card” holders, will also be eligible to apply for the I-601A waiver.

The I-601A provisional waiver provides a significant advantage over the regular I-601 waiver.  The main advantage is that the applicant may apply for the I-601A provisional waiver before leaving the United States to attend the interview for an immigrant visa at a U.S. Consulate or Embassy.  As a result, the amount of time that the applicant spends outside the United States is greatly reduced, from a matter of months or years in some cases, to a matter of weeks in the majority of cases.

Please remember that this expansion of the I-601A provisional waiver of unlawful presence will not take place until August 29, 2016.

Applications for waivers are complex.  I strongly suggest that you work closely with an experienced immigration attorney to handle your waiver application.  I have years of experience handling many waiver applications with success.  Please give me a call at the office at (734) 369-3131 or email me at mike@mcarlinlaw.com for more information.

What is “extreme hardship”? Part 2

A couple of days ago, I wrote the first of two posts about “extreme hardship” in immigration law.  Today, in the second post, I write about the question of exactly what “extreme hardship” is, and how we can show it.

In many immigration cases, we must show extreme hardship to the spouse or parent of the person applying for the immigration benefit.  In some cases, we may show extreme hardship to the child of the applicant.  The applicant’s qualifying relatives – spouses, parents, and (in some cases) children – must be either U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents.

As we stated in the first post, we need to show harships of both separation and relocation.

“Extreme hardship” is open to interpretation.  U.S. government officials may consider many different types of hardships.  Many of the most common hardships involve financial concerns, medical conditions, educational goals, psychological or emotional issues, family ties, and conditions in the location where the applicant would be living if the waiver is not granted.  In order to explain the hardship to the qualifying relatives, we must imagine that the applicant for the waiver is living in his or her home country.

Financial concerns:  An assessment of the loss of income to the household as a result of the applicant’s residence outside the United States, and the ripple effects that this loss can have on the well-being of the qualifying relatives.

Medical conditions:  The effects on the qualifying relatives of the potential lack of access to medical care in the country of relocation, and the potential loss of access to medical care in the United States due to loss of income or loss of insurance coverage.

Educational goals: The effects of the applicant’s absence on the education of qualifying relatives, including the loss of educational opportunities in the country of relocation, or the loss of opportunities in the United States due to financial or time constraints.

Psychological or emotional issues: The stress and anxiety that result from separation of qualifying relatives from the applicant, and the stresses and pressures that would accompany the qualifying relative’s relocation to another country.

Family ties: The qualifying relative’s connections to relatives in the United States, vs. connections to relatives in the country of relocation.

Country conditions:  Aspects of life in the country of relocation, including housing conditions, sanitation, educational opportunities, safety, social or political unrest, violence, environmental risks.

An application for a waiver based on a showing of extreme hardship requires significant careful preparation, planning, and documentation.  I have extensive experience in preparing these applications, and a strong record of success.

What is “extreme hardship”? Part 1

In many immigration cases, in order to help a client to obtain permanent resident, or “green card” status, we need to establish something called “extreme hardship” to a qualifying relative, such as the applicant’s spouse or parent who is a U.S. citizen or permanent resident.

For example, if you entered the United States without permission, without a visa, and without presenting yourself to U.S. immigration officials when you entered, then you might not be eligible to obtain your green card while you are in the United States.  You would need to go to a U.S. Consulate in your country of origin and apply for an immigrant visa.  If you are approved, then you receive the immigrant visa and enter the United States as a permanent resident.

The problem, however, is that if you are living in the United States without permission for 1 year or more, and then you leave the United States, you will be subject to the “10-year bar,” which means that you will not be permitted to enter the United States until you have spent 10 years outside, unless you obtain a waiver.  If you are granted the waiver, then you are permitted to enter the United States without the need to spend 10 years outside.

In order to obtain the waiver, we must convince the U.S. immigration officials that the denial of the waiver will result in “extreme hardship” to your spouse or parent who is a U.S. citizen or a permanent resident.  In order to obtain the waiver, we must imagine that we don’t have the waiver, and that you, the applicant, must spend 10 years outside the United States, living in your home country.

Then, we must imagine two different scenarios:

(1) Your spouse or parent who is a U.S. citizen or permanent resident remains in the United States and is separated from you for 10 years.

(2) Your spouse or parent who is a U.S. citizen or permanent resident lives with you, outside the United States, in your home country for 10 years.

We must show that BOTH of these scenarios will result in “extreme hardship” to your spouse or parent.  If we convince U.S. immigration officials that BOTH of these scenarios will result in extreme hardship, then you will be granted the waiver, and you will not be required to spend 10 years outside the United States.

In Part 2, we will explore the question of exactly what is “extreme hardship” and how we can show it.

The Waiver Process: Seeking a Pardon

Some potential applicants for permanent residence face certain barriers to being approved.  Some of the most common roadblocks include entering the United States without permission, or remaining in the United States beyond the expiration of a visa.  Some people qualify to ask for a waiver of the grounds that make them ineligible for permanent residence.

This area of immigration law has some complexities, and it is best to consult with an immigration lawyer about your particular situation.

Under the “Resources” section of our website, we have some brief documents that outline various aspects of Immigration Law.

Please take a look at our brief overview of the Waiver Process.